Julien Chorier Pre-2014 TNF TransGranCanaria Interview

An interview with Julien Chorier before the 2014 TNF Transgrancanaria.

By on February 26, 2014 | 1 comment

Julien Chorier is a methodical runner who carefully chooses his focus races. This year he kicks off his season at TransGranCanaria, his first-ever race in the Spain. In the following interview, Julien talks about how he’s trained this off season, what running the first race of the year is like, who should contend for the win at TGC, and what other races he’ll be focusing on this year.

[Editor’s Note: Get up to speed on this year’s race with our full 2014 TransGranCanaria preview and join us for our live TransGranCanaria coverage this weekend!]

[Click here if you can’t see the video above.]

Julien Chorier Pre-2014 TNF Transgrancanaria Interview Transcript

iRunFar: Bryon Powell of iRunFar here with Julien Chorier before the 2014 Transgrancanaria. How are you, Julien?

Julien Chorier: Fine. Nice to meet you again.

iRunFar: Nice to see you, yes. The weather here is different than home?

Chorier: It’s a little bit hot, a little sun—it’s so nice.

iRunFar: In the winter, what sports do you do? Do you run or do you do other sports?

Chorier: This year we don’t have a lot of snow in France. That’s why I’ve practiced a lot of running, some bicycle, but no skiing.

iRunFar: No skiing? In other winters do you normally ski a lot?

Chorier: Yes, a lot.

iRunFar: Where are you from in France?

Chorier: I’m near Chambéry in the Alps.

iRunFar: Wow, there’s still not enough snow… or there’s good-enough weather for you to run a lot?

Chorier: For me it’s easier to run a lot because every time you can run, but if the weather is bad it’s difficult to climb. That’s the only problem I have.

iRunFar: So this winter you think you’ve had enough training to run well at a race this early in the year?

Chorier: Yeah, for me it’s very early in the season. I have a lot of uncertainty of my… a lot of uncertainty for the distance. There is a lot of climb.

iRunFar: You’ll find out how fit you are.

Chorier: Sorry. I have no problems. All is okay. Yeah, I feel good.

iRunFar: One nice thing about racing at this time of year is your body is fresh and you’re excited about running in the mountains?

Chorier: Yes. I’m very excited. It’s the first race of the year. It’s different with a new team. All is new for me. It’s my first race in Spain.

iRunFar: You’ve never raced in Spain before?

Chorier: No, I’m very excited.

iRunFar: So it’s a new experience, and you’ve not raced in Hoka yet. It’s your first race wearing Hokas?

Chorier: Yes, my first race in Hoka. All is new.

iRunFar: Will you be running in the Mafate Speed or what shoe will you race in?

Chorier: I’m not sure—maybe Mafate Speed or maybe Rapanui.

iRunFar: There’s a lot of great competition here.

Chorier: A lot of.

iRunFar: Who might be up there at the front? Who might win this?

Chorier: It’s difficult to say. There are five or six people who are very fast like Timothy [Olson], Sébastien [Chaigneau], Scott [Jurek], Miguel [Heras].

iRunFar: Maybe you?

Chorier: I hope.

iRunFar: Best of luck, Julien. It was great talking to you.

Chorier: Thank you very much.

iRunFar: We’ll see you also a few times more this year. You’re running at Hardrock?

Chorier: Hardrock and Raid de la Réunion.

iRunFar: Hardrock and Reunion—those are your main races for the year?

Chorier: Yes.

iRunFar: Good luck this year.

Chorier: Thank you very much.

Bryon Powell

Bryon Powell is the Editor-in-Chief of iRunFar. He’s been writing about trail running, ultrarunning, and running gear for 15 years. Aside from iRunFar, he’s authored the books Relentless Forward Progress: A Guide to Running Ultramarathons and Where the Road Ends: A Guide to Trail Running, been a contributing editor at Trail Runner magazine, written for publications including Outside, Sierra, and Running Times, and coached ultrarunners of all abilities. Based in Silverton, Colorado, Bryon is an avid trail runner and ultrarunner who competes in events from the Hardrock 100 Mile just out his front door to races long and short around the world, that is, when he’s not fly fishing or tending to his garden.