Sylvain Court Pre-2016 IAU Trail Worlds Interview

An interview (with transcript) with Sylvain Court before the 2016 IAU Trail World Championships.

By on October 27, 2016 | Leave a reply

Sylvain Court of France returns to the IAU Trail World Championships as the defending world champ. In the following interview, Sylvain talks about what happened at Transvulcania, how he feels going into this year’s race, and how the French team looks this year.

For more on who else is racing, check out our in-depth men’s and women’s previews. You can also follow along with our extensive live race coverage on Saturday.

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Sylvain Court Pre-2016 IAU Trail World Championships Interview Transcript

iRunFar: Bryon Powell of iRunFar here with Sylvain Court before the 2016 IAU Trail World Championships. How are you?

Sylvain Court: Yes, I’m fine. I’m very well for the moment.

iRunFar: You were the champion last year, and you have returned. Do you feel as strong? Has your training been as good as last year?

Court: Yes, last year I had big form. This year, my season start was very medium. In September and October, I had a lot of very good training. For the moment, the form is very good.

iRunFar: Earlier in the year you ran Transvulcania and you were not as strong maybe. What happened at Transvulcania?

Court: Transvulcania, I had bad form and a back injury. It was a bad race for me.

iRunFar: This year, you’ve won the French Trail National Championships. When was that, and what was the distance?

Court: 55k.

iRunFar: What month was that?

Court: 3,400 meters of elevation.

iRunFar: A lot of climbing.

Court: A lot of climbing.

iRunFar: Was that in September or October or earlier in the year?

Court: September 6 or 7.

iRunFar: Good preparation for the world championships?

Court: Very good preparation for the world championships. After, I started with big preparation with a lot of training about 30 hours of training per week.

iRunFar: Is it all slow, or do you also run around a track like athletics?

Court: My training is a mix of the track for fast running and the weekends are a lot of mountains with ascent and descent faster.

iRunFar: So lots of training with a mix of speed and mountains. This year do you do you feel as good and as strong, is your form as good right now as last year before the championships?

Court: Similar? I feel good at this moment. After the race, you have many, many questions of my form, but I feel very good for the moment and also the day of the race.

iRunFar: You feel strong, and you have some confidence from the French Trail National Championships? Does it give you confidence? Does it make you feel mentally strong and good going into the race?

Court: My mind? Yes, I’m very, very motivated for the world championships. It’s my first objective of this season.

iRunFar: The whole year goes to the world championships? This is your primary objective for the year?

Court: Yes.

iRunFar: Last year, the French team was also the champion. Do you think the French team is very strong this year?

Court: Yes, I think we have a strong French team similar to last year.

iRunFar: Is there one nation that you think will be the biggest competitor? The biggest challenge?

Court: The U.S. is a big strong team, and the Spanish team with Luis Alberto [Hernando], and Great Britain is very strong.

iRunFar: Best of luck. Bonne chance. Enjoy.

Court: Thank you very much.

Bryon Powell

Bryon Powell is the Editor-in-Chief of iRunFar. He’s been writing about trail running, ultrarunning, and running gear for 15 years. Aside from iRunFar, he’s authored the books Relentless Forward Progress: A Guide to Running Ultramarathons and Where the Road Ends: A Guide to Trail Running, been a contributing editor at Trail Runner magazine, written for publications including Outside, Sierra, and Running Times, and coached ultrarunners of all abilities. Based in Silverton, Colorado, Bryon is an avid trail runner and ultrarunner who competes in events from the Hardrock 100 Mile just out his front door to races long and short around the world, that is, when he’s not fly fishing or tending to his garden.